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Are you going through a difficult medical situation? BrainStyles founder Marlane Miller was diagnosed and treated with breast cancer. In this post, she explains how BrainStyles helped her through the process. Learn how BrainStyles may help also help you through a difficult medical situation like cancer.

Over the past few years I’ve been diagnosed and treated for breast cancer. Twice.  BrainStyles helped me through the entire process.

Brainstyles - Handling A Difficult Medical Situation
Brainstyles - Handling A Difficult Medical Situation

Are you going through a difficult medical situation right now?

New Situations.  Being diagnosed with any illness is what we call a Time Zero™ event: a new situation where you must draw from your natural gifts to make a decision.  Knowing that my brainstyle is one that draws from the right brain of emotions, pictures, and imagination, when I got the news that yes, it was cancer, and yes, there would be a mastectomy, I was stricken. Speechless. Overwhelmed with fear. I started a drawing journal because I couldn’t put things into words. Words were all scary (and needed my left brain, the part of the brain I draw from later, and less often). The right brain doesn’t have words and I just had feelings which could, I found, be drawn about.

Accepting Your Non-Strengths.  I knew I couldn’t handle all the information explained by the surgeon and the four oncologists we consulted. I knew I would react emotionally. I cried often. I did not add to my problem by telling myself how I should be different. I did not feel guilty for not being able to follow all the technical information about the chemotherapy. I used a partner with a different, analytical brainstyle to attend all the appointments who could listen for me and track the tons of information. BrainStyles taught me which brainstyle was best and why.

Timing.  I also am not good at deciding rationally quickly. I know I’ll decide based on what feels best. In choosing what treatment to ask for, this may not be the best process.  Also, I need time to think over information because I’m busy feeling the impact of the pictures my busy right brain conjures. When I was too afraid, my emotional center (the amygdala) just shut down all pictures of hairless, breastless reality to come and I would rest.  My husband-to-be would be my left brain and collect the information that we could talk over later. Calmly.  It may have taken longer, but considerable stress was lessened.

Making Decisions.  Knowing that people with my brainstyle seek first to be comfortable in relationships, I was able to be more objective in my choice of doctors.  I had to set aside my desire to have an oncologist who had the same warm and friendly brainstyle. I’d watched my mother (with the same brainstyle ) choose the oncologist who held her hand instead of the technical expert who had the latest technology.  Instead, I went with the Wicked Witch of the West who was head of research at the hospital recommended by the experts at Johns Hopkins.  I allowed myself to be uncomfortable in office visits if I would get the best and latest cures.

Each brainstyle  handles these situations differently.  In the coming weeks and months, we hope to introduce you to people with different brainstyles, and show how they each handled their difficult medical situation.

If you have been affected by a difficult medical situation, we welcome you with open arms and would like to tell you that you are not alone.